Turing shader extensions and Visual Studio 2019 support for SPIR-V Extension

I have released an updated version of the SPIR-V Extension to the Visual Studio Marketplate. If you already have this installed in Visual Studio, you can update it from the extension window. Version 0.6 adds support for Visual Studio 19 and nvidia’s new turing shader extension, allowing you to generate SPIR-V from the IDE for ray tracing (generation, hit, miss, etc.), mesh and task shaders. Supported shader extensions: .vert (Vertex shader) . [Read More]

OpenGL hardware database overhaul

After reworking the OpenGL ES hardware database some time ago (which was in dire need of an update to be usable again) I have also released a substantial update to the OpenGL hardware database. Server-side processing Biggest change is the use of server-side processing (as with the Vulkan and OpenGL ES databases), so gone are the days where each request to the report listing page would fetch all reports at once, and had the client do the heavy lifting, resulting in a long delay before any filtering or sorting could be done. [Read More]

Delphi/Pascal OpenGL Header updated to 4.6

The Delphi/Pascal OpenGL headers have been updated to support OpenGL 4.6. The current version of this header can always be found at the github repository, the 4.6 release has also been tagged. This version adds support for all ARB extensions added to OpenGL 4.6 and brings a few cross-platform fixes (mostly for Free Pascal) along with a few fixes and added constants for a few extensions that have been missing. [Read More]

SPIR-V Extension for Visual Studio

Source (C#) and download (VSIX for VS2015) can be found at https://github.com/SaschaWillems/SPIRV-VSExtension With the launch of Vulkan, SPIR-V has been introduced as it’s binary shader format, replacing text based shader formats in favor of an intermediate representation. To make life a bit easier I have just released a Visual Studio (2015) extension that adds SPIR-V related commands to the context menu of shader files (and folders containing shader files): [Read More]

Introducing gpuinfo.org

Aside from playing around with a certain new API, I’ve also been working on the web front end OpenGL and OpenGL ES hardware database. Though I redid the visual side of both some time ago they differed too much for my taste and especially the OpenGL ES database was lacking lots compared to the OpenGL one. No live search, bad visuals (especially for the reports), lacking compare features and much more. [Read More]

glCapsViewer 1.0 beta release

I just released version 1.0 (beta) of the OpenGL hardware capability viewer (C++ port using Qt). Note that it’s a beta release and my first C++ (and Qt) application released to the public. Release on gitHub: https://github.com/SaschaWillems/glCapsViewer/releases/tag/v1.0-beta Binary downloads (win32) : https://github.com/SaschaWillems/glCapsViewer/releases/download/v1.0-beta/glcapsviewer_v1_0-beta_win32.7z or http://opengl.delphigl.de/releases/glcapsviewer_v1_0-beta_win32.7z If you find any bugs, please post them in the comment section or (better) open an issue at the github repository. Right now windows only, other platforms (linux first) will follow as soon as I’ve moved the project to CMake. [Read More]

New features and url for the OpenGL hardware database

In preparation for the release of the next glCapsViewerversion (C++), the OpenGL hardware database has been completely overhauled and also got a new url for easier access. After releasing the sources to the php front end of the database, I decided to clean up the sources for all pages, throw out old (bad) code and add in new features using external libraries like DataTables. The OpenGL hardware database was my first php based web project, so much of the code wasn’t very pretty, and almost all search and filter functions were hard coded and not available everywhere and for all table columns. [Read More]

Going GitHub with gl(ES)CapsViewer

In my last posting for 2014, I wrote a little bit about going open source with my projects. So I took the C++ rewrite of the OpenGL hardware capability viewer as a first step in releaasing more of my sources to the public. And while I found bitbucket to be fine, I decided to move over to GitHub. Most of the developers I use to interact with are there (and not on bitbucket), and I prefer their UI and functionality over bitbucket (plus they seem to be super active with adding new stuff). [Read More]

2014 - Final posting

As another year ends, it’s time for a small retrospect. Next year marks the 10th anniversary of my personal blog, so I’ve been posting about my programming adventures for over a decade now (the first version of www.delphigl.de went online 2003 afair) and I’m still having lots of fun hacking code into different IDEs with different languages, though focus is shifting from time to time. And that’s actually what makes coding so much fun, it’s a constant learning progress that forces you to constantly sharpen your coding skills, learn new languages, adopt to new technologies etc. [Read More]