Vulkan Hardware Capability Viewer 1.2 released

I have released an update to the Vulkan Hardware Capability Viewer. The new version (1.2) adds support for os-specific surface capabilities that are added to the reports and online database.

This adds a new category to the tool and reports at the online database (for example this one) containing:

  • Surface properties (extents, usage flags, transforms, etc.)
  • Surface Formats (incl. color spaces)
  • Present modes

You can download the new version from http://vulkan.gpuinfo.org/download.php, downloads are available for Windows, Linux and Android (arm and x86).

The Android version (for now arm only) is now also available at the google playstore.

Vulkan Hardware Capability Viewer 1.2 released

Soruces for simple OpenGL 2.0 HUD/GUI for android

device-2014-07-18-210940As I’m currently prototyping a new game for Android, I was in need of a quick (and simple) way of adding some selectable text elements on top of my 3D OpenGL ES scene. So I created a simple demonstration with full source (you can get them from my OpenGL ES git repository) that renders a 3D scene and a basic hud with clickable text elements on top of it in orthogonal mode.

The text elements are rendered to an OpenGL ES texture, using android’s canvas, making this a very flexible way of drawing text on top of an OpenGL ES scene. Note that this isn’t very fast, so the texture should only be updated when necessary. The demo has a menu along with a fps counter, so the texture will be updated every second, and the elements can be clicked and the hud’s observers will be notified with the clicked element’s id so you can easily react on user input.

Though this isn’t something you’d use in a production app where performance is crucial, it should be good start for rapid prototyping needs where you need to have some basic gui or hud to issue commands. And you’re always free to improve the sources (feel free to fork) to make it perform better, by e.g. only updating the areas of the texture where text changed, instead of updating every time if one of the elements is changed.

Soruces for simple OpenGL 2.0 HUD/GUI for android

Android OpenGL ES repository

device-2014-06-29-171344Following the C++ (OpenGL) repository, I recently added an Android OpenGL ES repositry (using Java) over here. It currently only contains two public demos, one for a simple stl viewer and another one for using the camera input of an android device as an OpenGL ES texture, but over time I plan on adding more and more demos.

And though I used to mock Java in the past I really like coding with Java nowadays. It’s partially because of the language itself (with all it’s modern features) but also because Eclipse is an awesome IDE. So expect more android demos and sources from me in the future.

Android OpenGL ES repository

OpenGL ES CapsViewer updated to 0.3

High on the heels of the last release (0.2),  I just updated the OpenGL ES CapsViewer to version 0.3.

Changelog :

  • Changed way of setting up the OpenGL ES render context
    Certain devices (mostly those with PowerVR GPUs) were reporting wrong OpenGL ES versions (e.g. 1.1 instead of 2.0). I’ve changed the way of setting up the highest possible OpenGL ES version, so those devices should now display their real supported OpenGL ES version.
  • Additional duplicate check
    The app will now check whether your device (with it’s current OpenGL ES and android version) is already present in the database before actually having you input your name and uploading it. If it’s already present you can directly jump to the device report.
  • Action bar at screen bottom
    On narrow devices (usually phones), the action bar will now be display at the bottom of the screen. That should improve the actions’ visibility.

The update should be automatically installed, and if you’ve submitted a device where 0.2 reported a wrong OpenGL ES version, please feel free to resubmit it.

 

OpenGL ES CapsViewer updated to 0.3

OpenGL ES CapsViewer update to 0.2

ic_launcherI’ve just released an update for the OpenGL ES CapsViewer to google’s playstore. This version should fix crashes upon startup that seemed to be caused by a wrong egl configuration, so for this version I’ve changed the method of selecting the egl configuration for the render context.

So if the application crashed on your device feel free to update (in case you’ve turned automatic updates off) the the most recent version and submit your OpenGL ES reports.

There are already ~30 different devices present in the online database, and over the last few days I added some new features like comparing reports and more listings to the database.

Note that for certain devices (like this Samsung Galaxy Tab 2), the OpenGL ES CapsViewer will read OpenGL ES 1.1 (CM) as the supported OpenGL ES version, though it should actually support OpenGL ES 2.0. Since I don’t have such a device it’s hard to test why it only reports OpenGL ES 1.1.

OpenGL ES CapsViewer update to 0.2

OpenGL ES Caps Viewer available on Playstore

My first ever mobile app is now available over at Google’s PlayStore! This is a premiere for me, and though I wasn’t on wether to spend the 25$ registration fee for the google’s developer console, I hope many android apps and games will follow.

device-2014-02-02-202348 device-2014-02-02-202410 device-2014-02-02-202423  device-2014-02-02-202459

[appbox googleplay de.saschawillems.glescapsviewer]

The OpenGL ES CapsViewer is the mobile counterpart to the OpenGL CapsViewer, reading the OpenGL ES implementation info of your Android device, as well as device information that may be of use to developers. As with the desktop counterpart these reports can then be submitted to the online database, where (game) developers interested in creating OpenGL ES apps for the android platform can take a look at the capabilities of the different devices.

It currently supports the following features :

  • Basic device information (Name, CPU, screensize)
  • Hardware sensors (including their range and resolution)
  • OpenGL ES implementation information
  • OpenGL ES extensions
  • OpenGL ES compressed texture formats, shader and program binary formats
  • OpenGL ES caps for 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0
  • EGL implementation information

As for the hardware requirements, it should work with Android 3.0 (and up) and needs OpenGL ES 1.0 to work. I’m not that deep into android development, so I may be  a bit off with the requirements, and I’m not certain on wether there’s any use in adding support for handsets with old Android version (2.x and below).

Please note that this is the first release, and that I only have limited ways of testing. I did tests on several mobile devices (my Huawei Ascend G510, differnt current Samsung devices and several emulators), so this first release may not be as stable as I want it to be 😉

So if you encounter any problems or crashes, please drop me a line and I’ll look into it. Also note that that online database is a work-in-progress too, and stuff like comparing reports will be added at a later point.

I hope this Android OpenGL ES hardware database will become as valuable to the developer community as the desktop OpenGL hardware database, which is currently approaching 500 hardware reports. So let me use this posting as a way of thanking all of you that contributed (and still contribute) to that database!

OpenGL ES Caps Viewer available on Playstore

3D loader for android, first roaming zombies

A 3d game needs 3d models, so I wrote a simple .obj (wavefront) model loader, and it was surprisingly easy with java. It took me roughly 30 minutes and is no more than 50 lines of code (including declarations and comments). So the “game” (still no gameplay in) can now display 3d models, and since it’s a zombie game, I’ve put in a (drum roll please) zombie! But it’s not just visual, but also backed by an NPC class that makes it move (more or less randomly) around the dungeon in a turn based manner.

device-2014-01-28-135250 device-2014-01-28-135411 device-2014-01-28-135538

Next on my list are 3d models for the doors, which are currently plain textured (and two-sided) quads that you can simply pass through. And replacing them with 3d models will allow me to add opening animations (think of the first resident evil games), and I also plan to use doors as a gameplay element that’ll hold back zombies that chase you. I’ve also implemented a simple gesture based model viewer that I’ll use to display items to the player (weapons and such).

After adding the doors I’m going to implement color picking for touch inputs, so that the player can interact with the objects in the 3d world, for e.g. opening the doors by touching them (or gestures for locked doors), hitting enemies or picking up items. Since it’s OpenGL ES 2.0, all the rendering is done using shaders anyway, and just adding shaders for color picking and reading pixel colors should be an easy task, especially as I’ve been using that technique in several other games too.

As far as the model format is concerned, I plan to use .obj just in the beginning. It’s ASCII based, so it’s taking up lots of space, is slow to parse (compared to a binary format), and the most important drawback is the lack of animation. It supports neither keyframe animation, nor bones or anything else do store animations. I guess I’ll go the same route for android as with my Delphi projects and create my own binary 3d file format that’ll implement animations.

I’ve also already gathered dozens of gameplay ideas, including randomly generated zombies from a pool of different body parts (heads, upper and lower parts, arms, weapons) and I even think about taking photos of your friends or relatives, that can then be used as zombie faces. Should make up for a pretty nice moment if a zombified friend of yours is trying to rip you apart 😉

3D loader for android, first roaming zombies

Zombie infected random dungeon crawling

2014 started off pretty busy and I haven’t had that much time to work on my current (and first) android project. But at least I wrote down the first pages of the basic game design draft, and I plan on doing a randomly generated, zombie themed dungeon crawler with not your usual zombie story.

device-2014-01-11-110401  device-2014-01-11-110513  device-2014-01-11-110614

So in terms of gameplay it’ll be a traditional dungeon crawler (think of “Eye of the Beholder“, or more recently “Legend of Grimrock“), with semi-realtime movement but with a modern horror theme based on a zombie infection (yeah, I know, zombies are all around nowadays, see the success of DayZ, but I always wanted to do something with zombies anyway). It’ll have RPG elements like health, stamina, skills, experience and an inventory sytem and I plan on having the items generated procedurally like the dungens itself. I even though about randomly generated enemies with random body parts that can be comnnected at random, though I’m not certain if that’ll work out as I want it to be.

I already got the basic engine up and running, and did the first performance optimiziations (visibility checks), so it’ll run smooth and nice on even lower end devices (like my Huawei Ascend G510, it “only” has a dual core with 1,2 GHz and a mere 512 MBytes of memory). I added smooth animations for turning and moving, and wrote a nice looking shader for per-pixel based spotlight shading with distanc attenuation, which is basically a low-powered flashlight that makes up for a an eerie and claustrophobic atmosphere. What you can’t see on the screenshots : It’s animated and sways around and flickers, and I plan on adding some kind of touch or sensor based way of having to regenerate the batteries from time to time to add some suspension to the gameplay.

As soon as things have settled, I’ll post more information on this project, including some of the technical aspects of the “engine”.

Zombie infected random dungeon crawling

2013 – Final posting – Dwelling in randomly generated mobile Dungeons

Another year has (almost) passed, and as with the previous years I’ll keep up the tradition of publishing a final posting before heading into 2014. From a personal point-of-view, 2013 wasn’t thad bad (though still far from perfect) like some of the years before. I still earn my money as a sofware developer using delphi and love my job, and recently I even bought the house I’ve been spending most of my 32 years in (though there is still a bit of renovation to be done, but the house itself is in a good shape).

As far as my personal programming stuff goes, those of you that follow my blog may have (hopefully) noticed that I moved away from Delphi and went over to Java, mainly because of mobile development for Android devices. I’ve been wanting to develop for smartphones and tablets for some time and the move was easier than I expected. It didn’t take long to get a gripe of the Java syntax, and together with Eclipse I’m pouring out lines of code like never before. The more I work with Java (and Eclipse), the more I realize how far behind Delphi has fallen. It’s sad to see that Embarcadero seems to focus on the wrong areas of Delphi, and instead of fixing their base and giving the community a free Delphi version they hold onto stuff like FireMonkey and decided to release a new Delphi version every 6 months. Though quick release cycles can be good, I don’t think they’re suited for such an expensive development tool. But well, if you take a look around the hobbyist community you’ll quickly notice that nobody cares about Delphi anymore. Especially for OpenGL development, people either moved to Lazarus and/or Free Pascal or (like me) moved over to another programming language. The sad thing about this is that communites I’ve used to be active an have gotten pretty quit over the past few years.

And no posting without any programming stuff! Since I’m totally not into that christmas and holiday stuff I had plenty of time for coding during the recent days, and so I decided to do something gaming / OpenGL related for Android. And therefore I ported the random dungeon generator I described in this article over to Java, and though it’s still in it’s very early stages, you can already walk around randomly generated dungeons on a mobile device.

dungeoncrawler_2013-12-29-204317 dungeoncrawler_2013-12-29-204526 dungeoncrawler_2013-12-29-204538

This is my first Java project that uses several different techniques. It’s based on OpenGL ES 2.0, uses different shaders for e.g. per-pixel lighting (which makes for easy flickering torches), a texture loader, a (yet simple) touchbased OpenGL GUI and much more. I don’t know if I’ll make it into a complete game, but I want to at least release a techdemo. I’ve got plenty of ideas and want to make heavy use of gestures for e.g. solving puzzles, making attacks, etc. I’m also not sure about the setting yet and still swaying between a more common theme (medieval, like the Eye of the Beholder-Series), something in the future (maybe a trapped cyborg in a futuristic factory) or something dark, psychologic and eerie in the vein of Trugbild. Maybe I’ll even open-source it 😉

And thus ends 2013, may 2014 bring forth more Android-related stuff (as long as Cthulhu won’t wake up from it’s eternal slumber cthulhu)

In addition to wishing all of my readers and friends a happy and healthy 2014 I’d like to dedicate this posting to a very special person that’s going through a hard time, seing that makes me pretty sad and it’s even harder not knowing how to really help 🙁

2013 – Final posting – Dwelling in randomly generated mobile Dungeons