Tag Archives: procedural

Javascript repository

Following Java (on Android) and C++ (on Windows), I just released my first Javascript sources over at my bitbucket repository. My first (ever) public JavaScript demo is the random dungeon generator that I wrote an article about (a long time ago).

It generates rarnddungeon06ndom dungeons of different sizes and can be tested directly in your browser over here.
Included are the JavaScript sources for the random dungeon generator that use HTML5 for drawing a simple representation of the randomly generated rooms and corridors.

My plan now is to add some more randomness, some game-related features and to write a WebGL-renderer, so you can walk the dungeons in your browser, with maybe a game to follow.

Zombie infected random dungeon crawling

2014 started off pretty busy and I haven’t had that much time to work on my current (and first) android project. But at least I wrote down the first pages of the basic game design draft, and I plan on doing a randomly generated, zombie themed dungeon crawler with not your usual zombie story.

device-2014-01-11-110401  device-2014-01-11-110513  device-2014-01-11-110614

So in terms of gameplay it’ll be a traditional dungeon crawler (think of “Eye of the Beholder“, or more recently “Legend of Grimrock“), with semi-realtime movement but with a modern horror theme based on a zombie infection (yeah, I know, zombies are all around nowadays, see the success of DayZ, but I always wanted to do something with zombies anyway). It’ll have RPG elements like health, stamina, skills, experience and an inventory sytem and I plan on having the items generated procedurally like the dungens itself. I even though about randomly generated enemies with random body parts that can be comnnected at random, though I’m not certain if that’ll work out as I want it to be.

I already got the basic engine up and running, and did the first performance optimiziations (visibility checks), so it’ll run smooth and nice on even lower end devices (like my Huawei Ascend G510, it “only” has a dual core with 1,2 GHz and a mere 512 MBytes of memory). I added smooth animations for turning and moving, and wrote a nice looking shader for per-pixel based spotlight shading with distanc attenuation, which is basically a low-powered flashlight that makes up for a an eerie and claustrophobic atmosphere. What you can’t see on the screenshots : It’s animated and sways around and flickers, and I plan on adding some kind of touch or sensor based way of having to regenerate the batteries from time to time to add some suspension to the gameplay.

As soon as things have settled, I’ll post more information on this project, including some of the technical aspects of the “engine”.

2013 – Final posting – Dwelling in randomly generated mobile Dungeons

Another year has (almost) passed, and as with the previous years I’ll keep up the tradition of publishing a final posting before heading into 2014. From a personal point-of-view, 2013 wasn’t thad bad (though still far from perfect) like some of the years before. I still earn my money as a sofware developer using delphi and love my job, and recently I even bought the house I’ve been spending most of my 32 years in (though there is still a bit of renovation to be done, but the house itself is in a good shape).

As far as my personal programming stuff goes, those of you that follow my blog may have (hopefully) noticed that I moved away from Delphi and went over to Java, mainly because of mobile development for Android devices. I’ve been wanting to develop for smartphones and tablets for some time and the move was easier than I expected. It didn’t take long to get a gripe of the Java syntax, and together with Eclipse I’m pouring out lines of code like never before. The more I work with Java (and Eclipse), the more I realize how far behind Delphi has fallen. It’s sad to see that Embarcadero seems to focus on the wrong areas of Delphi, and instead of fixing their base and giving the community a free Delphi version they hold onto stuff like FireMonkey and decided to release a new Delphi version every 6 months. Though quick release cycles can be good, I don’t think they’re suited for such an expensive development tool. But well, if you take a look around the hobbyist community you’ll quickly notice that nobody cares about Delphi anymore. Especially for OpenGL development, people either moved to Lazarus and/or Free Pascal or (like me) moved over to another programming language. The sad thing about this is that communites I’ve used to be active an have gotten pretty quit over the past few years.

And no posting without any programming stuff! Since I’m totally not into that christmas and holiday stuff I had plenty of time for coding during the recent days, and so I decided to do something gaming / OpenGL related for Android. And therefore I ported the random dungeon generator I described in this article over to Java, and though it’s still in it’s very early stages, you can already walk around randomly generated dungeons on a mobile device.

dungeoncrawler_2013-12-29-204317 dungeoncrawler_2013-12-29-204526 dungeoncrawler_2013-12-29-204538

This is my first Java project that uses several different techniques. It’s based on OpenGL ES 2.0, uses different shaders for e.g. per-pixel lighting (which makes for easy flickering torches), a texture loader, a (yet simple) touchbased OpenGL GUI and much more. I don’t know if I’ll make it into a complete game, but I want to at least release a techdemo. I’ve got plenty of ideas and want to make heavy use of gestures for e.g. solving puzzles, making attacks, etc. I’m also not sure about the setting yet and still swaying between a more common theme (medieval, like the Eye of the Beholder-Series), something in the future (maybe a trapped cyborg in a futuristic factory) or something dark, psychologic and eerie in the vein of Trugbild. Maybe I’ll even open-source it 😉

And thus ends 2013, may 2014 bring forth more Android-related stuff (as long as Cthulhu won’t wake up from it’s eternal slumber cthulhu)

In addition to wishing all of my readers and friends a happy and healthy 2014 I’d like to dedicate this posting to a very special person that’s going through a hard time, seing that makes me pretty sad and it’s even harder not knowing how to really help 🙁

Random Dungeon Generation

After deciding to take a small break from working on “Phase 2” for Projekt “W”, I decided to do something I’ve been thinking about since I played my first dungeon crawler (Eye of the Beholder) over 15 years ago :  a random dungeon generator. Back in that time I already gave it a shot but nothing really ever came out of it, so I decided to try again. But this time it worked out really nice and I now have a fine random dungeon generator, creating nice random dungeons that could be used in a game. Actually I even have an idea for a game using this, though if it ever sees the light of the day it will be a very unique take at the “genre” and it won’t be a big project (cause at some point I’d like to release “Phase 2”).

And since just telling you that I made something like a random dungeon generator wouldn’t really be worthy of a whole news posting I also wrote a rather extensive article on that subject. It’s not a tutorial or including the source code, but it’s rather a journal on how I started from scratch trying to create a random dungeon generator. So maybe it’s interesting to some, but since I also talk about how I do it people may also get some ideas out of that article on how to do their own random dungeon generators. Note that the generator is neither finished nor that my solution is the perfect one, but I think it’s a nice take on the whole subject.

Read the “Random Dungeon Generation” article.

And also note that this is my first article, but I hope to write more articles concerning game programming, game design and such in the future.