Tag Archives: gamedesign

3D loader for android, first roaming zombies

A 3d game needs 3d models, so I wrote a simple .obj (wavefront) model loader, and it was surprisingly easy with java. It took me roughly 30 minutes and is no more than 50 lines of code (including declarations and comments). So the “game” (still no gameplay in) can now display 3d models, and since it’s a zombie game, I’ve put in a (drum roll please) zombie! But it’s not just visual, but also backed by an NPC class that makes it move (more or less randomly) around the dungeon in a turn based manner.

device-2014-01-28-135250 device-2014-01-28-135411 device-2014-01-28-135538

Next on my list are 3d models for the doors, which are currently plain textured (and two-sided) quads that you can simply pass through. And replacing them with 3d models will allow me to add opening animations (think of the first resident evil games), and I also plan to use doors as a gameplay element that’ll hold back zombies that chase you. I’ve also implemented a simple gesture based model viewer that I’ll use to display items to the player (weapons and such).

After adding the doors I’m going to implement color picking for touch inputs, so that the player can interact with the objects in the 3d world, for e.g. opening the doors by touching them (or gestures for locked doors), hitting enemies or picking up items. Since it’s OpenGL ES 2.0, all the rendering is done using shaders anyway, and just adding shaders for color picking and reading pixel colors should be an easy task, especially as I’ve been using that technique in several other games too.

As far as the model format is concerned, I plan to use .obj just in the beginning. It’s ASCII based, so it’s taking up lots of space, is slow to parse (compared to a binary format), and the most important drawback is the lack of animation. It supports neither keyframe animation, nor bones or anything else do store animations. I guess I’ll go the same route for android as with my Delphi projects and create my own binary 3d file format that’ll implement animations.

I’ve also already gathered dozens of gameplay ideas, including randomly generated zombies from a pool of different body parts (heads, upper and lower parts, arms, weapons) and I even think about taking photos of your friends or relatives, that can then be used as zombie faces. Should make up for a pretty nice moment if a zombified friend of yours is trying to rip you apart ๐Ÿ˜‰

The challenges of a game’s sound design

Usually I’d add some nice screenshots to show off progress on “Phase 2“, but this time it’s an area of game development that’s pretty hard to show off in screenshots :ย  Sound design.

I find this is one of the hardest parts as far as game design goes, at least for me. I do all the parts of game development on my own (design, code, content, etc.) but when it comes down to sound design, the result is usually so bad or bland that (I guess) most people just turn it off. I remember searching for and creating sounds for a shmup some years ago that took weeks, and when I heard the combined result of that effort running in-game I knew that I just had wasted a lot of time. It was just horrible. Though I don’t have any problems imagining how certain aspects of the game should look and feel, I usually don’t have a clue about “how” a game is actually supposed to sound.

As for the sound design for Projekt “W” – it’s pretty much non-existant. All the sounds in the current build are the same as on the first release of “Phase 1”, and these few sounds don’t add anything to the atmosphere and some of them (like the menu swoosh) are downright annoying. So during the last few weeks I played through some smaller indie games (mostly from IndieDB) and payed close attention to the sound design of these titles. I then quickly noticed that even a few simple GUI sounds can add a lot to the atmosphere of a game, and if you combine them with a fitting soundtrack (I’m still searching for new background tracks, more in the ambient vein) they quickly become a real bonus to the game’s atmosphere.

And since people think that the graphics are pretty good for a one-man hobby project I’d like to get the sound design to a similar level. So for the last few days I’ve been collecting and creating new samples for the user interface (with samples for actions, units, projects, etc. to follow) and even though I only changed and added half a dozen basic UI sounds (button clicks, menu transitions, confirmations, etc.) the sound design has already become a much closer fit for the game’s visuals.

So hopefully theย  new sound design (that’ll at least partially come with the next release) will add even more atmosphere to the game!

And since I’m sure that a few (hobby) game deves read this : How do you handle sound design? Do you have the same troubles, or is there any easy way to get this part of game design right?